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The Dead Sea Holidays

  • Dead Sea
 

Although its name might suggest otherwise, The Dead Sea is actually a saline lake situated on the borders of Jordan and Israel. Some 400metres below sea level (another confusing contradiction!), The Dead Sea has several claims to fame. The surface of the shore is the lowest point on the planet, is the world’s most mineral-laden body of water and is famed for its health benefits. In fact, The Dead Sea was one of the world’s first health resorts; Herod the Great was known to favour it during his rule.

To float in The Dead Sea’s salty waters is one of those travel experiences that shouldn’t be missed. It is simply impossible to swim or put your legs down horizontally in the water but a good photo session is definitely in order. Most people aim for the classic ‘reading a book while floating on back’ option. Once you are happy with your shots, cake yourself in black mineral-laden mud and give your skin a deep clean.

The waters of The Dead Sea are warm and the scenery picturesque. The minerals in the water make the colours vibrant in the reliable sunshine while the rocks around the edges are encrusted with a thick layer of glistening salt. Don’t leave it too long before you visit though; the water level is dropping by about a metre a year. If this continues, The Dead Sea will be turned into a dry saltpan in about 45 years.

Tours visiting The Dead Sea